Chapter 4: Select Committees

Establishment of committees

184    Establishment and life of select committees

(1)     The following select committees are established at the commencement of each Parliament:

(a)     the subject select committees specified in Standing Order 188, and

(b)     the Officers of Parliament Committee, the Privileges Committee, the Regulations Review Committee, and the Standing Orders Committee.

(2)     The House may establish other select committees.

(3)     A select committee continues in existence for the duration of the Parliament unless the House provides otherwise or, in the case of a committee established for a particular purpose, until the committee makes its final report.

185    Membership of committees

(1)     The overall membership of select committees must, so far as reasonably practicable, be proportional to party membership in the House.

(2)     The Business Committee may determine the size of each committee.

(3)     The Business Committee may appoint members to serve on each committee and may fill a vacancy in the membership of a committee.

186    Non-voting members

(1)     The Business Committee may appoint a member to serve on a select committee but without the right to vote on any question put to the committee or participate in any decision taken by leave of the committee.

(2)     Such membership may be permanent, for a limited time, or for consideration of a particular matter.

(3)     The Business Committee may end such an appointment.      

187    Changes in membership

(1)     A change in the membership of a select committee may be a permanent change for the life of the committee or a temporary change for a limited time or for consideration of a particular matter.

(2)     Permanent changes in the membership of committees may be made by the Business Committee.

(3)     A temporary change in the membership of a committee may be made by the leader or a whip of the party or parties to which each member involved belongs. A temporary change involving an Independent member may be made by agreement between the Independent member and the leader or a whip of the party to which the other member belongs.

(4)     A member may not be replaced on a committee during any period in which the member is suspended from the service of the House.

Subject select committees

188    Subject select committees

The subject select committees and their subject areas are—

Commerce Committee: business development, commerce, communications, consumer affairs, energy, information technology, insurance, superannuation, and tourism

Education and Science Committee: education, education review, industry training, research, science, and technology

Finance and Expenditure Committee: audit of the financial statements of the Government and departments, Government finance, revenue, and taxation

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee: customs, defence, disarmament and arms control, foreign affairs, trade, and veterans’ affairs

Government Administration Committee: civil defence, cultural affairs, fitness, sport and leisure, internal affairs, Pacific Island affairs, Prime Minister and Cabinet, racing, services to Parliament, State services, statistics, and women’s affairs

Health Committee: health

Justice and Electoral Committee: courts, Crown legal and drafting services, electoral matters, human rights, and justice

Law and Order Committee: corrections, criminal law, police, and serious fraud

Local Government and Environment Committee: conservation, environment, and local government

Māori Affairs Committee: Māori affairs

Primary Production Committee: agriculture, biosecurity, fisheries, forestry, lands, and land information

Social Services Committee: housing, senior citizens, social development, work and income support, and youth development

Transport and Industrial Relations Committee: accident compensation, immigration, industrial relations, labour, occupational health and safety, transport, and transport safety.

189    Functions of subject select committees

(1)     The subject select committees specified in Standing Order 188 consider and report to the House on the following types of business referred by the House or otherwise under the Standing Orders:

(a)     bills:

(b)     petitions:

(c)     annual reviews:

(d)     Estimates:

(e)     Supplementary Estimates:

(f)      international treaty examinations:

(g)     reports of Officers of Parliament:

(h)     any other matters.

(2)     The subject select committees may receive briefings on, or initiate inquiries into, matters related to their respective subject areas as specified in Standing Order 188.

(3)     Paragraph (2) does not allow a subject select committee to consider—

(a)     a bill that has not been referred to it, except as provided in the Standing Orders, or

(b)     a Supplementary Order Paper relating to a bill that is not before the committee—

          without the approval of the House or the Business Committee.

Meetings of committees

190    Time for meetings

(1)     The first meeting of a select committee is held at a time appointed by the Speaker.

(2)     A committee adjourns until the time it decides that it should next meet. In the absence of a time decided by the committee for its next meeting, the chairperson, by notice in writing, decides when it should next meet.

(3)     If there is no chairperson or deputy chairperson or if they are both absent from New Zealand, the Speaker may exercise the chairperson’s power to decide when the committee should meet.

(4)     The Business Committee may determine that a select committee may meet at a time otherwise prohibited under Standing Order 191 or 194(1)(b) or (c).

191    Meetings on Fridays

Except by leave of the committee, a select committee may not meet on a Friday in a week in which there has been a sitting of the House.

192    Place of meeting

(1)     A select committee may meet at any place within New Zealand.

(2)     A committee must be authorised by the House before it can meet outside New Zealand.

(3)     Where a committee is authorised to meet outside New Zealand it may adopt such practices and procedures that it sees fit for its meetings overseas.

193    Meetings outside Wellington area

A committee may meet outside the Wellington area—

(a)     during a sitting of the House only with the agreement of the Business Committee, and

(b)     otherwise than during a sitting of the House only if the committee has itself agreed to the place for its meeting.

194    Meetings within Wellington area

(1)     When meeting within the Wellington area, a select committee may not meet—

(a)     during oral questions:

(b)     during a sitting of the House except by leave of the committee:

(c)     during an evening (after 6 pm) on a day on which there has been a sitting of the House.

(2)     When a meeting within the Wellington area is in progress at 6 pm on a day on which there has been a sitting of the House, it may be continued while the leave of the committee is forthcoming in order to conclude business before the committee.

Powers of committees

195    Seeking evidence

(1)     The chairperson of a select committee may, on behalf of the committee, request any person to attend and give evidence before the committee.

(2)     The chairperson may, on behalf of the committee, request that papers and records that are relevant to its proceedings be produced.

196    Exercise of power to send for persons, papers, and records

(1)     A committee with the power to send for persons, papers, and records may order that a summons be issued to any person—

(a)     to attend before that committee to be examined and give evidence:

(b)     to produce papers and records in that person’s possession, custody or control to that committee.

(2)     Every summons issued under this Standing Order—

(a)     must state the time and place at which it is to be complied with by the person to whom it is addressed, and

(b)     is signed by the Speaker and served upon the person concerned under the Speaker’s direction.

197    Application to Speaker for summons

(1)     A select committee without the power to send for persons, papers, and records may apply to the Speaker, in writing, seeking the issue of a summons to any person—

(a)     to attend and be examined and give evidence before the committee:

(b)     to produce papers and records in that person’s possession, custody, or control to the committee.

(2)     When an application is received, a summons may be issued if the Speaker is satisfied that—

(a)     the evidence, papers, or records sought by the committee are necessary to its proceedings, and

(b)     the committee has taken all reasonable steps to obtain the evidence, papers, or records.

(3)     Every summons issued under this Standing Order—

(a)     must state the time and place at which it is to be complied with by the person to whom it is addressed, and

(b)     is signed by the Speaker and served upon the person concerned under the Speaker’s direction.

198    Subcommittees

(1)     A select committee may appoint a subcommittee.

(2)     Committees may prescribe rules for the conduct of subcommittee proceedings provided that these rules are consistent with the Standing Orders. Subject to any such rules, the same rules for the conduct of proceedings in a subcommittee apply as apply to a select committee.

199    Criminal wrongdoing

(1)     Without the express authority of the House, a select committee may not inquire into, or make findings in respect of, allegations of crime by persons who are named or otherwise identifiable.

(2)     A select committee is not prevented, by reason of paragraph (1), from conducting inquiries, and making findings, of a general nature into alleged criminal wrongdoing by persons who are not named or otherwise identifiable.

200    Charges against members

(1)     A select committee (except the Privileges Committee) may not enquire into, or make findings in respect of, the private conduct of any member of the House, unless it is specially directed by the House to do so.

(2)     If any information comes before a select committee or any allegation is made to a select committee (except the Privileges Committee) charging any member with reprehensible conduct, the committee must inform the member concerned of the details of the charge and give the member a reasonable opportunity to make any statement to it bearing on the matter. Otherwise the committee may not proceed further on that information or allegation without being specially directed by the House to do so.

Chairperson and deputy chairperson

201    Chairperson and deputy chairperson

(1)     At its first meeting, or at its first meeting after a vacancy occurs in the office, a select committee must proceed to the election of a chairperson and the appointment of a deputy chairperson.

(2)     The chairperson and the deputy chairperson may be removed from office by the committee only at a meeting of which at least seven days’ notice is given of a member’s intention to move for such a removal.

(3)     The Speaker is the chairperson of the Officers of Parliament Committee.

202    Absence of chairperson

(1)     In the absence of the chairperson—

(a)     during a meeting, or

(b)     from New Zealand,—

and during a vacancy in the office, the deputy chairperson may perform the duties and exercise the authority of the chairperson.

(2)     If the chairperson and the deputy chairperson are not present at the commencement of a meeting, the committee may elect a member of the committee to chair that meeting and perform the duties and exercise the authority of the chairperson in respect of the meeting.

(3)     The chairperson or the deputy chairperson may, while chairing a meeting, ask any member of the committee to chair the meeting while the chairperson or deputy chairperson is absent. Any such member performs the duties and exercises the authority of the chairperson while chairing the meeting.

203    Transfer of powers of chairperson during meeting

(1)     The chairperson of a select committee may invite the committee to authorise the deputy chairperson or, in the absence of the deputy chairperson, any other member of the committee to chair meetings while a particular item of business is considered.

(2)     The chairperson may participate as a committee member when the deputy chairperson or another member is authorised to chair a meeting under this Standing Order.

(3)     A member who chairs a meeting under this Standing Order performs the duties and exercises the authority of the chairperson while chairing the meeting.

Conduct of proceedings

204    Conduct of proceedings

Subject to the express provisions of the Standing Orders or any practice of the House to the contrary, the same rules for the conduct of proceedings are followed by select committees as apply to the conduct of proceedings in a committee of the whole House.

205    Notice of meeting

(1)     A written notice informing members of the committee of a meeting of the committee is to be circulated by the clerk of the committee no later than the day before the meeting. The notice must contain a summary of the items of business proposed to be dealt with at the meeting.

(2)     The requirement for a written notice to be circulated may be waived if all members of the committee, or the leaders or whips of their respective parties, agree. When a meeting has lapsed or been adjourned for lack of a quorum, agreement is required under this paragraph only from those members who were expected to attend that meeting. Agreement from non-voting members is not required under this paragraph.

206    Giving notice of business

(1)     Members of a committee may give notice of business or motions to be considered by the committee either orally at a meeting of the committee or in writing to the clerk of the committee.

(2)     Notices given at a meeting and notices given to the clerk of the committee before 2 pm on the day before a meeting are placed on the agenda for the next meeting of the committee or, where the Standing Orders prescribe a longer period of notice, for the first meeting at which the notice may be considered.

(3)     Nothing in this Standing Order affects the chairperson’s power to rule on whether a proposed notice is in order.

207    Question previously decided

A motion or an amendment that is the same in substance as a motion or amendment that was agreed to or defeated in a select committee may be proposed again in that committee in the same calendar year only by leave or if notice has been given.

208    Names of members present

The names of the members of a select committee present at a meeting are recorded in the committee’s minutes.

209    Quorum

(1)     The quorum of a select committee is half of the membership of the committee (rounded upwards where applicable).

(2)     A non-voting member is not counted as part of the membership of a committee for the purposes of determining the quorum.

(3)     If there is no quorum present within 10 minutes of the time for a meeting to commence, the meeting is adjourned. If there is no quorum present during a meeting, the meeting is suspended for up to 10 minutes and, if no quorum is formed, the meeting is adjourned.

210    Members may be present

(1)     Subject to this Standing Order, any member of the House (not being a member of the committee) may attend any meeting of a select committee but can participate in the proceedings only by leave of the committee.

(2)     The Minister or member in charge of a bill may take part in the proceedings of the committee even though not a member of the committee but may not vote on any question put to the committee.

(3)     Except by leave of the committee, only members of the Privileges Committee may attend any meeting of that committee while the committee is deliberating.

211    Advisers

(1)     A select committee may seek the assistance of persons as advisers to the committee during its consideration of a matter.

(2)     Advisers may remain present during relevant proceedings that are not open to the public, unless excluded by the committee.

212    Attendance by strangers

A select committee may—

(a)     invite any person to be present during relevant proceedings that are not open to the public to assist it in its consideration of any matter:

(b)     by leave, allow a stranger (not present to assist the committee) to be present during proceedings that are not open to the public.

213    Voting

A member may require that the respective votes or abstentions of each member present on a question put to a select committee be recorded in the committee’s minutes.

214    Disorder

(1)     The chairperson may order any stranger to withdraw from a meeting if that person’s conduct is disorderly.

(2)     The chairperson may order any member (not being a member of the committee) to withdraw from a meeting if that member’s conduct is disorderly.

(3)     A select committee may resolve to exclude a member of the committee from its meeting if that member’s conduct is highly disorderly. The member may be excluded for up to the remainder of the meeting held on that day.

General provisions for evidence

215    Written submissions

A witness will be given the opportunity to make a submission in writing before appearing to give oral evidence.

216    Return of evidence

A select committee may return or expunge any evidence or statement that it considers to be irrelevant to its proceedings, offensive, possibly defamatory, or suppressed by an order of a New Zealand court.

217    Release of submissions

(1)     A select committee may make a written submission to it available to the public at any time after receiving it.

(2)     A submission (if not already made available) becomes available to the public on the committee hearing oral evidence from the witness who made the submission.

(3)     This Standing Order does not prevent the release of a submission by the person who submitted it.

218    Private evidence

(1)     Some or all of the evidence to be given to a select committee may, by leave, be heard or received in private.

(2)     The committee may require all strangers or any stranger to withdraw from a meeting while evidence is being heard in private.

(3)     Evidence heard or received in private is confidential to the committee until it reports to the House or otherwise concludes its consideration of the item of business to which the private evidence relates.

219    Secret evidence

(1)     A select committee may, by leave, declare evidence to be secret evidence where—

(a)     information that it wishes to obtain can be obtained only if it can assure a witness, or other person in possession of that information, that evidence given to it will remain confidential, or

(b)     it is satisfied that it is necessary to do so to protect the reputation of any person.

(2)     All strangers must withdraw from a meeting while secret evidence is being heard, unless leave is given for them to remain present.

(3)     Except to give effect to Standing Order 237, secret evidence may not be disclosed to any other person by the committee or by any member of the committee or by any other person, unless the House expressly authorises such disclosure. Following the committee’s report to the House, secret evidence is delivered into the custody of the Clerk.

220    Application for evidence to be private or secret

(1)     Before providing written evidence to a select committee, a person may apply for that evidence to be received in private or in secret. Where practicable, witnesses are informed before providing written evidence that such an application may be made.

(2)     Before giving evidence, or at any time while being heard, a witness may apply for any or all of the evidence of that witness to be heard in private or in secret. All witnesses are informed before giving evidence that such an application may be made.

(3)     A witness must give reasons for any such application.

(4)     Before giving evidence in private, a witness will be informed that the evidence will become available when the committee reports to the House or, if it may seriously damage the reputation of any person, will be made available to that person. Before giving evidence in secret, a witness will be informed that secret evidence may be disclosed to give effect to Standing Order 237 and that the House has the power to order the disclosure of such evidence.

221    Access to information

A select committee will give a witness reasonable access to any material or other information that the witness has produced to the committee.

Hearing of evidence

222    Public attendance at hearings

(1)     The proceedings of any select committee during the hearing of evidence are open to the public, unless the evidence is private or secret.

(2)     A committee may require all strangers or any stranger to withdraw from a meeting while the committee is formally receiving a delegation that includes a member, or members, of another Parliament.

223    Matters of concern before giving evidence

A person who is to appear before a committee may raise any matters of concern relating to that evidence with the clerk of the committee before appearing before the committee. Any such matters will be brought to the attention of the committee.

224    Conduct of examination

(1)     The examination of witnesses is conducted as the chairperson, with the approval of the select committee, directs.

(2)     The chairperson, and every member through the chairperson, may put questions to a witness.

225    Relevance of questions

(1)     The chairperson will take care to ensure that all questions put to a witness are relevant to the committee’s proceedings and that the information sought by those questions is necessary for the purpose of those proceedings.

(2)     A witness may object to a question on the ground that it is not relevant. The chairperson will then determine whether it is relevant to the committee’s proceedings.

226    Objection to answering

Where a witness objects on any ground to answering a relevant question put to the witness, the witness will be invited to state the ground upon which objection to answering the question is taken.

227    Committee consideration of objection

(1)     Where a witness objects to answering a question on any ground, the select committee, unless it decides immediately that the question should not be pressed, will then consider in private whether it will insist upon an answer to the question, having regard to the importance to the proceedings of the information sought by the question.

(2)     If the committee decides that it requires an answer to the question, the witness will be informed of that decision, and is required to answer the question.

(3)     The committee may decide that the public interest would best be served by hearing the answer in private or secret.

(4)     Where a witness declines to answer a question to which the committee has required an answer, the committee may report this fact to the House.

228    Counsel

(1)     A witness may be accompanied by counsel (of the witness’s choice) and may consult counsel in the course of a meeting at which the witness appears.

(2)     Counsel may—

(a)     make written submissions to the committee on the procedure to be followed by the committee:

(b)     with the committee’s agreement, address the committee on the procedure to be followed by the committee before counsel’s client is heard:

(c)     object to a question to counsel’s client on the ground that it is not relevant:

(d)     object to counsel’s client answering a question:

(e)     when the client’s reputation may be seriously damaged by proceedings of a committee, ask that further witnesses give evidence in the client’s interest.

229    Witnesses’ expenses

(1)     No expenses may be paid to any witness or proposed witness except with the permission of the Speaker.

(2)     No select committee, chairperson, member or other person may give any undertaking, promise or assurance to any person that any expenses of a witness or proposed witness will be paid out of public money without first obtaining the authority of the Speaker.

230    Evidence on oath

(1)     A select committee may order any person to take an oath or make an affirmation before giving evidence to it.

(2)     When a person gives evidence on oath or affirmation, the oath or affirmation is administered by the clerk of the committee.

231    Transcripts of evidence

(1)     A select committee may decide to record and, if it thinks fit, transcribe evidence given to it.

(2)     Reasonable opportunity will be afforded to witnesses to make corrections of errors of transcription in any transcript of their evidence.

Natural justice

232    Disqualification for apparent bias

A member who has (whether in the House or outside the House) made an allegation of crime or expressed a concluded view on any conduct or activity of a criminal nature, identifying by name or otherwise a person as being responsible for or associated with that crime, conduct, or activity (referred to as apparent bias), may not participate—

(a)     in any select committee inquiry into that person’s responsibility for or association with that crime, conduct, or activity, or

(b)     in any other proceedings in a select committee that may seriously damage the reputation of that person.

233    Complaints of apparent bias

(1)     A complaint of apparent bias on the part of a member of a select committee may be made by any member (whether or not a member of the committee) or by any person appearing or about to appear before the committee whose reputation may be seriously damaged by proceedings of the committee.

(2)     A complaint of apparent bias must be made, in writing, to the chairperson.

(3)     The chairperson, after considering any information or comment from the member against whom the complaint is made, decides whether the member is disqualified by reason of apparent bias.

(4)     Any member of a committee who is dissatisfied with the chairperson’s decision on a complaint of apparent bias may refer the matter to the Speaker for decision. The Speaker’s decision is final.

234    Evidence containing allegations

(1)     At any stage during a select committee’s proceedings, the committee may consider hearing in private evidence that contains an allegation that may seriously damage the reputation of a person. The committee may also invite that person to be present during the hearing of such evidence.

(2)     A person who is to appear before a committee will be informed of or given a copy of any evidence (other than secret evidence) or material in the committee’s possession that contains an allegation that may seriously damage the reputation of that person.

235    Access to information by person whose reputation may be seriously damaged

(1)     Any person whose reputation may be seriously damaged by proceedings of a select committee may request from the clerk of the committee a copy of all material, evidence (except secret evidence), records, or other information that the committee possesses concerning that person.

(2)     The committee considers any such request and may, if it considers it to be necessary to prevent serious damage to that person’s reputation, furnish such material.

(3)     The committee may furnish such material in a form different from that requested if to provide it in the form requested would impose undue difficulty, expense, or delay.

236    Irrelevant or unjustified allegations

When a witness gives evidence that contains an allegation that may seriously damage the reputation of a person and the select committee is not satisfied that that evidence is relevant to its proceedings or is satisfied that the evidence creates a risk of harm to that person, which risk exceeds the benefit of the evidence, the committee will give consideration—

(a)     to returning any written evidence and requesting that it be resubmitted without the offending material:

(b)     to expunging that evidence from any transcript of evidence:

(c)     to seeking an order of the House preventing the disclosure of that evidence.

237    Information about allegation that may seriously damage reputation

(1)     When, in evidence heard or received in public or in private, an allegation is made against a person that may seriously damage the reputation of that person, the committee will—

(a)     apply Standing Order 236, and

(b)     if the evidence is not to be returned, resubmitted or expunged under that Standing Order, inform that person of the allegation.

(2)     When, in evidence heard or received in secret, an allegation is made against a person that may seriously damage the reputation of that person, the committee will—

(a)     apply Standing Order 236, and

(b)     if the evidence is not to be returned, resubmitted, or expunged under that Standing Order, inform that person of the allegation if it appears to the committee that the possible damage to that person’s reputation outweighs any detriment to the witness who gave the secret evidence.

(3)     When, in advice provided to a committee, an allegation is made against a person that may seriously damage the reputation of that person, the committee will—

(a)     return the advice (if it is in writing) after considering whether to request that it be provided again without the allegation, or

(b)     inform that person of the allegation.

238    Responding where allegation may seriously damage reputation

(1)     Any person against whom an allegation has been made that may seriously damage the reputation of that person, and who has been informed of that allegation under Standing Order 237—

(a)     will be given a reasonable opportunity to respond to the allegation by written submission and appearance before the committee, and

(b)     may ask that further witnesses give evidence to the committee in that person’s interest.

(2)     A response made or further evidence given under this Standing Order is received or heard—

(a)     in private, if the allegation was made in private evidence or in advice:

(b)     in secret, if the allegation was made in secret evidence.

Information on proceedings

239    Confidentiality of proceedings

(1)     The proceedings of a select committee or a subcommittee other than during the hearing of evidence are not open to the public and remain strictly confidential to the committee until it reports to the House.

(2)     Paragraph (1) does not prevent—

(a)     the disclosure, by the committee or by a member of the committee, of proceedings to a member of Parliament or to the Clerk or another officer of the House in the course of their duties:

(b)     the disclosure of proceedings in accordance with the Standing Orders.

(3)     The following proceedings may be disclosed:

(a)     those proceedings that do not relate to any business or decision still before the committee:

(b)     those proceedings in respect of matters of process or procedure that do not—

  • relate to decisions on matters of process or procedure that are still before the committee, or
  • include any substantive proceedings relating to business before the committee, or
  • reflect, or divulge the content of, a report or draft report or the committee’s potential findings.

(4)     A committee making an interim report or a special report to the House may resolve that some or all proceedings relating to the report remain confidential to the committee until it reports finally to the House.

240    Confidentiality of reports

(1)     A report or a draft of the report of a select committee or a subcommittee is strictly confidential to the committee until it reports to the House.

(2)     Paragraph (1) does not prevent—

(a)     the disclosure, by the committee or by a member of the committee, of a report or a draft report to a member of Parliament or to the Clerk or another officer of the House in the course of their duties:

(b)     the disclosure of a report or a draft report in accordance with the Standing Orders.

241    Confidentiality of lapsed business

(1)     Any proceedings of a select committee or draft report that are confidential to the committee on the dissolution or expiration of Parliament remain confidential for nine sitting days in the new Parliament.

(2)     If the business to which proceedings or a draft report relate is reinstated by the House or is readopted by the committee concerned within nine sitting days of the opening of the new Parliament, those proceedings or the draft report continue to remain confidential in accordance with Standing Orders 239 and 240.

242    Information on committee’s proceedings

(1)     The chairperson of a select committee or a subcommittee may, with the agreement of the committee, make a public statement to inform the public of the nature of the committee’s consideration of a matter.

(2)     The committee or subcommittee may make its proceedings available to any person for the purpose of assisting in the committee’s consideration of a matter. When proceedings have been disclosed under this paragraph, any evidence provided in response to those proceedings is received in private, unless it is received in secret.

(3)     Select committee proceedings that cease to be confidential under Standing Order 239 become available to the public.

Reports

243    Interim reports

A select committee may from time to time make an interim report informing the House of some only of its conclusions on a bill or other matter before it or of the progress of its investigation into a bill or other matter.

244    Special reports

A select committee may from time to time make a special report to the House seeking authority from the House to do something, or seeking guidance from the House on some procedural question which has occurred in the committee, or informing the House of some other matter connected with its proceedings which it considers should be reported to the House.

245    Minority views

A select committee may, in its report, indicate the differing views of its members.

246    Findings

(1)     As soon as practicable after a select committee has determined any findings to be included in a report to the House, and prior to the presentation of the report, any person named in the report whose reputation may be seriously damaged by those findings must be acquainted with any such findings and afforded a reasonable opportunity to respond to the committee on them. The committee will take such a response into account before making its report to the House.

(2)     Any response made under this Standing Order is strictly confidential to the committee until it reports to the House.

247    Reports to be signed

When a select committee has adopted a report, the report is signed by the chairperson on behalf of the committee, or by some other member of the committee authorised to do so by the committee, and is presented to the House.

248    Day fixed for presentation of reports

When a day is fixed for the presentation of a select committee’s report, the final report must be made on or before that day, unless the House or the Business Committee grants further time.

249    Presentation of reports

(1)     A report of a select committee is presented by delivering it to the Clerk on any working day but no later than 1 pm on a day on which the House sits.

(2)     Once a report has been presented it is published under the authority of the House.

(3)     The Clerk announces the presentation of reports of select committees at the time appointed by Standing Order 66.

250    Reports set down

(1)     Following their presentation, reports of select committees are set down as follows:

(a)     a report from the Privileges Committee, except a report on a bill or a petition, is set down for consideration as general business:

(b)     a report on a bill is set down as prescribed in Standing Order 296:

(c)     reports on the Budget policy statement, the fiscal strategy report, the economic and fiscal update, the statement on the long-term fiscal position, the investment statement, the financial statements of the Government, Estimates, Supplementary Estimates, and annual reviews are considered as set out in Standing Orders 332, 336, 340, 347, and 349 or as determined under Standing Order 350:

(d)     a report on a notice of motion under Standing Order 322 or 323 is set down for consideration together with that notice of motion.

(2)     The Business Committee may direct that a report on a petition be set down as a Members’ order of the day.

(3)     A report on a briefing, inquiry, international treaty examination or other matter, or a report of the Regulations Review Committee, is set down as a Members’ order of the day.

(4)     A report set down under paragraph (2) or (3) may be selected by the Business Committee for debate.

251    Consideration of reports

(1)     On the consideration of any select committee report (other than a report on a bill or a report to which paragraph (2) applies), the chairperson or a member of the select committee moves a motion to take note of the report.

(2)     On the consideration of a report of the Privileges Committee containing a recommendation to the House, the chairperson or a member of that committee may move a motion that reflects that recommendation.

252    Government responses to select committee reports

(1)     The Government must, not more than 60 working days after a select committee report has been presented, present a paper to the House responding to any recommendations of the committee which are addressed to it.

(2)     No response under this Standing Order is required in respect of select committee reports on bills, Supplementary Order Papers, questions of privilege, Estimates, Supplementary Estimates, and annual reviews of departments, Offices of Parliament, Crown entities, public organisations, or State enterprises.